Skip to content
 

The CRT at Rustic Sunday

This article was originally posted on 13th August 2011. On 18th January 2012 it was noticed that it was no longer in the archive and has been recreated. It is not known when or how it went missing and apologies to anyone who tried to find it in the interim.

by Jonathan Foster

A young visitor to the Countryside Restoration Trust stand juggles the "island" to keep a top spinning as long as possible, without it falling off the board.

A young contestant juggles the "island" to keep a top spinning as long as possible, without it falling off the board.

Keep it on the island, lad. It’s 1 minute 7 seconds to win. Concentration terrific. Last go…………. Aargh! Groans all round! Nearly did it, but just pipped by Irene, a wool-spinner, who was determined to spin the top the longest to win it as a present for a friend.

Countryside Restoration Trust volunteer, Jim Crane, presents a top to Irene, a wool-spinner who kept the top spinning longer than anyone else. About 60 contestants took part during the afternoon.

CRT volunteer Jim Crane presents a top to Irene, a wool-spinner who kept the top spinning longer than anyone else. About 60 contestants took part during the afternoon.

July 31st. Rustic Sunday at the Rural Life Museum. The Pierrepont Wrinklies have set up a display to spread the Countryside Restoration Trust gospel, with me on pole lathe entertaining the visitors by turning more spinning tops to be spun for and won.

Blessed with glorious weather, warm sun and a cooling breeze, punters of all shapes, sizes and ages arrived in goodly numbers, all being puzzled by what I was turning…

Countryside Restoration Trust volunteer Jonathan Foster pumps the treadle on his pole lathe to turn a piece of wood he is turning into a top. Pole lathes dates back to at least Saxon times, though Jonathan built his in 2009.

CRT volunteer Jonathan Foster pumps the treadle on his pole lathe to turn a piece of wood he is turning into a top. Pole lathes date back to at least Saxon times, though Jonathan built his in 2009. The pole is simply a tree branch that is connected to the treadle by a cord looped around the piece of wood being turned.

…until told of the activity behind, with Jim Cane demonstrating and wife Marilyn extolling the virtues of the C.R.T and the Pierrepont Farm Open Day:

A graphic of a banner announcing Open Day events.

The list of Open Day events that was shown here in the original post has not been recreated.

A decorative bottom border to the Open Day banner.

In fact, there were still plenty milling around come closing time at five o’clock, but by that time my aching legs could scarcely turn the lathe.

A crowd gathers to see Countryside Restoration Trust volunteer, Jonathan Foster, turning wood on his pole lathe.

A crowd gathers to watch Jonathan finish making another top. The pole is just visible in the top right hand corner and the white cord connects it to the treadle.

Nevertheless, a thoroughly enjoyable and worthwhile day.