Skip to content
 

Rhodies come down as cupboard goes up

by Rod Kebble

Counrtyside Restoration Trust volunteers clearing one of the remaining areas of rhododendron in Tankersford Wood.

Volunteers working their way through one of the remaining areas of rhododendron in Tankersford Wood, with new recruit Martin Boag in the foreground.

On a sunny but very chilly morning, the conservation volunteers — including new recruit Martin Boag on his first working party — assembled yesterday to have their penulimate bash at the rhodies. The season ends with February, so as not to disturb nesting birds.

Tankersford Wood is now running out of areas of rhododendron, so the autumn season might see the start of an attack on the rhodies of Wey Wood (though each time I forecast that, another clump is found in Tankersford), where a lot of the ground is steeply sloped and the flat bits are boggy. Could be fun!

Mid-morning and Countryside Restoration Trust volunteer Ray Ashdown is already dwarfed by the pile of of cut rhoddedron. The brash (trimmings) will be burned and the larger branches used for firewood or charcoal.

Mid-morning and Ray Ashdown is already dwarfed by the pile of cut rhododendron. The brash (trimmings) will be burned and the larger branches turned into firewood or charcoal.

Meanwhile, “the two Brians” (Lavers and Sams) awarded themselves the warmer indoor job of building a cupboard to hold the volunteers’ kit being evicted from the education room. The brick base they laid a couple of weeks ago still seemed to be sticking to the floor, the two ends were built yesterday and the roof should go on next time. Something will go wrong…

Countryside Restoration Trust volunteers erecting a cupboard to store the volunteers' equipment, which is being removed from the education room.

Brian Lavers (left) and Brian Sams at work erecting a cupboard to store the volunteers’ equipment, now that the education room is closer to being used for its original intended use.