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Of trees

A fair number of birch trees were blown over in Tankersford Wood during the past winter.

Birch trees in Tankersford Wood, blown over in the high winds that arrived at various times during the past winter.

by Rod Kebble

The effects of last winter’s storms are still to be seen in Pierrepont Farm’s woods, where fallen trees lie along the ground or stand drunkenly propping each other up, leaning in whatever direction the winds blew them.

All the news is not bad however, as the flattened trees offer a good opportunity to our newly-qualified chainsaw operative, Kevin Young, to practise his skills while creating feedstock for the charcoal kiln or the farm’s stoves.

Some trees fell completely over with their roots wrenched free of the soil, while others had their trunks snapped off a couple of metres above ground level.

Bottoms up! Some trees had their roots wrenched free of the soil, while others had their trunks snapped off a couple of metres above ground level.

Since the winds died down, the conservation volunteers have carried out the long-planned planting of new lime trees to fill the gaps in a line of the trees that make up the border of the field immediately to the east of the slurry lagoon.

And last weekend, the same group planted a dozen oak saplings to the west of the dairy and in area of Tankersford Wood — which they had previously cleared of rhododendron — behind it.

A line of venerable beeches still mark a former field boundary in the wood, as they have done for decades.

One tree that has survived many winters is this venerable specimen, which is one of a line of beeches marking a former field boundary.